World Match Racing Tour. ALPARI

ISAF Special Event

  • Quarter Final View all results M1 M2 M3 M4 M5
    Björn Hansen
    Hansen Sailing Team
    0 0 0 0 0
    Johnie Berntsson
    Stena Sailing Team
    1 0 0 0 0
  • Quarter Final View all results M1 M2 M3 M4 M5
    Eric Monnin
    Swiss Match Race Team
    1 0 0 0 0
    Pierre Antoine Morvan
    Vannes Agglo Sailing Team
    0 0 0 0 0
  • Quarter Final View all results M1 M2 M3 M4 M5
    Staffan Lindberg
    Alandia Sailing Team
    0 0 0 0 0
    Taylor Canfield
    US One
    1 0 0 0 0
  • Quarter Final View all results M1 M2 M3 M4 M5
    Ian Williams
    GAC Pindar
    1 0 0 0 0
    Marek Stanczyk
    Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing
    0 0 0 0 0

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (24th Oct 2014): For the first time since 2003, Bermuda has been struck by hurricane strength winds not once but twice in the last fortnight. Yet remarkably over this period the mid-Atlantic British Overseas Territory has managed to lay on not just this week’s Argo Group Gold Cup, but last week hosted the world’s top golfers at the PGA Grand Slam. Being on the track of north Atlantic hurricanes means that the islanders have had to adapt over the years and for example a stringent set of building regulations help minimise the inevitable carnage when 100+ mph winds strike. Thanks to efforts of the National Hurricane Centre in the USA, hurricanes are not only tracked but great effort goes into projecting their track. After devastating several Caribbean islands, it was known several days in advance that Tropical Storm Fay and last Friday’s Hurricane Gonzalo were likely to strike Bermuda, so anticipating Gonzalo the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club delayed the start of the Argo Group Gold Cup by a day. Trees were uprooted by the effects of Hurricane Gonzalo Once Gonzalo passed they held a meeting to assess their situation. “If we had 95% of the island without electricity, then we’d have had a problem,” admits event Chairman Brian Billings. In the event only half the island lost power, one damaged International One Design was replaced and the devastation at the airport was such that it was operational again within 24 hours. “After numerous phone calls, we said ‘yes, we’re on’,” says Billings. Hurricane Gonzalo was vicious. Leaving the Caribbean it was rated as a Category 2 hurricane (83-95 knots) but hitting warm open water it built to a Cat 4 (113-136 knots) before downgrading marginally to a Cat 3 just before hitting Bermuda. Argo Group Gold Cup Event Chairman Brian Billings According to Billings, Gonzalo’s slow pace made it a ‘long storm’ with winds already up to storm force by 0700 local time on Friday and still honking by 1100 the next day. “In between my barograph took a very slow spin down and it went down to 27.5 [931mB] and then there was a little bit of a horizontal line and then she slowly came back up again…” This was in stark contrast to Hurricane Emily which came and went within just four hours. Strangest was the eye of the hurricane, continues Billings: “It was huge – it took an hour to pass. It was flat calm, very eerie and very misty – it was kind of weird. Then all of a sudden – womp – the eye wall hit and it came in with a vengeance, like someone threw a bucket of iced water at you unexpectedly.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo When Gonzalo struck Billings says the most wind he saw was 130mph while he was at home, however this was at sea level and it was stronger on higher ground. Despite this the devastation caused was surprisingly slight. This was partly thanks to Tropical Storm Fay having swept through a week earlier with winds of 110+mph. “When Fay hit we hadn’t had any major wind storm for quite a while, so the branches were heavy and we had a very wet August so there was a lot of foliage all over the place and the trees were all laden with flowers and buds, which added extra weight to them,” Billings continues. “So Fay took out of a lot of trees, and the clean up was longer than it was for Gonzalo - the roads were blocked for almost two days. Without that there could have been a lot more damage and the infrastructure could have suffered much more when Gonzalo hit.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo Through sheer luck, the timing of the two storms could not have been better. Fay hit leaving just enough time for the golf course at Port Royal to be cleaned up ready for the PGA Grand Slam, despite vast tree damage. “You wouldn’t have known it had happened - they got the course in great shape real fast,” says Billings. “Bermuda is very resilient and has a capability and the attitude to bounce back. People just jump in and help neighbours and we have our Bermuda regiment which helps.” During hurricanes, usually as devastating as the wind is the storm surge, the massive volume of water blown along ahead of the system. However this did not affect Bermuda. Billings explains: “They were forecasting 35-45ft seas outside of the reef line on the South Shore, but there is the reef that slows it down, so we don’t get a storm surge from there. If it goes from the north then it can come into the Great Sound, then it comes into the Harbour and has no place to go. That happened during Emily.” According to Billings hurricanes strike Bermuda once every 10 years. So having two in the space of a week means statistically they should be free of them for some years to come. Good news for the Argo Group Gold Cup in years to come hopefully.

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (24th Oct 2014): Picture postcard perfect conditions returned to Bermuda for the third and final day of Qualifying at the Argo Group Gold Cup, the sixth stage of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour. After yesterday’s torrential rain, Hamilton Harbour was bathed in glorious sunshine and breeze that by lunchtime was gusting up to the mid-teens. With the conclusion of Qualifying, the top four of the ten teams in each of the two Groups made it through to the Quarter Finals while a surprisingly high number of Alpari World Match Racing Tour card holders failed to make the cut. In fact just three – Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar crew, defending Tour champion Taylor Canfield and his US One team and Bjorn Hansen – made the top eight. Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team aced the Qualifying at Argo Group Gold Cup © Charles Anderson / AGGC While the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour leaders, Williams and Canfield, qualified in comfort yesterday, ending the series on 8.5 and 8 points respectively, with Bjorn Hansen and former Tour Card holder Johnnie Berntsson also standing out in Group 1, for the final four it was the usual close run thing. This was particularly true for Group 2 where in the final flight the winner of the Monnin v Poole and Gilmour v Stanczyk matches would go through while the loser would be on the flight home. Ultimately it was Switzerland’s Eric Monnin and Poland’s Marek Stanczyk and his Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing crew that were successful. Stanczyk was over the moon to have got through after a bumpy ride through this regatta, leading the first day while one of his crew suffering an injury yesterday. Today he bounced back. “I feel very good,” he said. “I was a little disappointed in the first race which we lost because of a problem with the jib tack which we didn’t solve as well as we should have. We sailed the second upwind leg with the jib totally eased.” Polish match racer Stancyzk mastered the conditions today © Charles Anderson / AGGC His crew Lukasz Kacprowski was back on board with a plaster covering the gash to his forehead, caused when he was hit by the boom yesterday as the Polish team threw themselves into a penalty turn in their match against Taylor Canfield. “He had the choice of having the cut stitched or glued and he had it glued because he is worried about his looks and didn’t want stitches!” confided Stancyzk. For Tour Card Holder David Gilmour the outcome today was less good, losing their final match to the Poles. “We felt in control of most of the prestart and then we made one small mistake right at the end - I tried to go for the kill rather than just getting a clear start and that cost us the whole race. I look back to the rest of the regatta and we had so many missed opportunities, which made it quite tough,” said Gilmour. France’s Mathieu Richard and his LunaJets crew also came close to making it through in Group 2, but were put out of the running when they were docked 0.5 points for causing damage following a collision in their match against Canfield. In Group 1, the outcome was a more complex and controversial one. This stemmed from a pre-start collision between Francesco Bruni and his Luna Rossa team and Keith Swinton’s Team Alpari FX crew. Team Alpari FX feeling under pressure © Charles Anderson / AGGC Swinton described it: “There was a dial-up - we were on starboard, they were on port. I think there was a bit of extra pressure today which we hadn’t really sailed in yet in this event and I just misjudged the dial-up and maybe turned up a little bit too late and we had small contact with them – our bow just hit the side of their boat. We were turning slightly later than him, so we got the penalty.” This collision saw Swinton docked 0.5 points and unhappy with this decision Swinton resorted to the jury. A hearing was promptly held and it was deemed that the points deduction had been appropriate. With this his Quarter Final berth evaporated. “We had a feeling that potentially the damage had been caused previously to that boat,” explained Swinton. “But the boat guy said we had caused some damage, so unfortunately we lost half a point and that made all the difference. It was unfortunate. We’ll just have to put it behind us.” As a result of Swinton’s half point deduction, former tour card holder, France’s Pierre Antoine Morvan and his Vannes Agglo Sailing Team claimed the final Quarter Final berth in Group 1. “We were a bit lucky, because we lost two races today,” admitted Morvan, who finished fifth at the Chicago Match Cup recently. “We need to up our level for the quarters.” The match that Morvan felt had made the most difference to their scoreline was when they beat defending Argo Group Gold Cup champion, Francesco Bruni and his Luna Rossa America’s Cup crew. The quarter finals flight got underway this afternoon and will be completed tomorrow morning at 0900 ADT, when conditions are set to turn lighter. Follow live race updates via Twitter at @wmrt_liverace. To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Stage 6 Argo Group Gold Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour Quarter-Finals ResultsJohnie Berntsson (SWE) Stena Sailing Team bt Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 1-0Eric Monnin (SUI) Swiss Match Race Team bt Pierre-Antoine Morvan (FRA) Vannes Agglo Sailing Team 1-0Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One bt Staffan Linberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team 1-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar bt Marek Stanczyk (POL) Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing 1-0 Final Results of QualifyingGroup 1 1 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 8.5-02 Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 7-23 Johnie Berntsson (SWE) Stena Sailing Team 6-34 Pierre-Antoine Morvan (FRA) Vannes Agglo Sailing Team 5-45 Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa 4.5-46 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 4.5-47 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Match The World 2-78 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NED) Korpershoek Racing 2-79 Somers Kempe (BER) Raymarine/Ocean Electronics 2-710 David Storrs (USA) Pequot Racing Team 1.5-7 Group 2 1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 8-12 Marek Stanczyk (POL) Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing 5-43 Eric Monnin (SUI) Swiss Match Race Team 5-44 Staffan Linberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team 5-45 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 4.5-46 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 4-57 Nathan Outteridge (SWE) Artemis Racing 4-58 Chris Poole (USA) Riptide Racing 4-59 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-610 Lance Fraser (BER) Digicel Bermuda 2-7

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (24th Oct 2014): Picture postcard perfect conditions returned to Bermuda for the third and final day of Qualifying at the Argo Group Gold Cup, the sixth stage of the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour. After yesterday’s torrential rain, Hamilton Harbour was bathed in glorious sunshine and breeze that by lunchtime was gusting up to the mid-teens. With the conclusion of Qualifying, the top four of the ten teams in each of the two Groups made it through to the Quarter Finals while a surprisingly high number of Alpari World Match Racing Tour card holders failed to make the cut. In fact just three – Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar crew, defending Tour champion Taylor Canfield and his US One team and Bjorn Hansen – made the top eight. Ian Williams and his GAC Pindar team aced the Qualifying at Argo Group Gold Cup © Charles Anderson / AGGC While the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour leaders, Williams and Canfield, qualified in comfort yesterday, ending the series on 8.5 and 8 points respectively, with Bjorn Hansen and former Tour Card holder Johnnie Berntsson also standing out in Group 1, for the final four it was the usual close run thing. This was particularly true for Group 2 where in the final flight the winner of the Monnin v Poole and Gilmour v Stanczyk matches would go through while the loser would be on the flight home. Ultimately it was Switzerland’s Eric Monnin and Poland’s Marek Stanczyk and his Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing crew that were successful. Stanczyk was over the moon to have got through after a bumpy ride through this regatta, leading the first day while one of his crew suffering an injury yesterday. Today he bounced back. “I feel very good,” he said. “I was a little disappointed in the first race which we lost because of a problem with the jib tack which we didn’t solve as well as we should have. We sailed the second upwind leg with the jib totally eased.” Polish match racer Stancyzk mastered the conditions today © Charles Anderson / AGGC His crew Lukasz Kacprowski was back on board with a plaster covering the gash to his forehead, caused when he was hit by the boom yesterday as the Polish team threw themselves into a penalty turn in their match against Taylor Canfield. “He had the choice of having the cut stitched or glued and he had it glued because he is worried about his looks and didn’t want stitches!” confided Stancyzk. For Tour Card Holder David Gilmour the outcome today was less good, losing their final match to the Poles. “We felt in control of most of the prestart and then we made one small mistake right at the end - I tried to go for the kill rather than just getting a clear start and that cost us the whole race. I look back to the rest of the regatta and we had so many missed opportunities, which made it quite tough,” said Gilmour. France’s Mathieu Richard and his LunaJets crew also came close to making it through in Group 2, but were put out of the running when they were docked 0.5 points for causing damage following a collision in their match against Canfield. In Group 1, the outcome was a more complex and controversial one. This stemmed from a pre-start collision between Francesco Bruni and his Luna Rossa team and Keith Swinton’s Team Alpari FX crew. Team Alpari FX feeling under pressure © Charles Anderson / AGGC Swinton described it: “There was a dial-up - we were on starboard, they were on port. I think there was a bit of extra pressure today which we hadn’t really sailed in yet in this event and I just misjudged the dial-up and maybe turned up a little bit too late and we had small contact with them – our bow just hit the side of their boat. We were turning slightly later than him, so we got the penalty.” This collision saw Swinton docked 0.5 points and unhappy with this decision Swinton resorted to the jury. A hearing was promptly held and it was deemed that the points deduction had been appropriate. With this his Quarter Final berth evaporated. “We had a feeling that potentially the damage had been caused previously to that boat,” explained Swinton. “But the boat guy said we had caused some damage, so unfortunately we lost half a point and that made all the difference. It was unfortunate. We’ll just have to put it behind us.” As a result of Swinton’s half point deduction, former tour card holder, France’s Pierre Antoine Morvan and his Vannes Agglo Sailing Team claimed the final Quarter Final berth in Group 1. “We were a bit lucky, because we lost two races today,” admitted Morvan, who finished fifth at the Chicago Match Cup recently. “We need to up our level for the quarters.” The match that Morvan felt had made the most difference to their scoreline was when they beat defending Argo Group Gold Cup champion, Francesco Bruni and his Luna Rossa America’s Cup crew. The quarter finals flight got underway this afternoon and will be completed tomorrow morning at 0900 ADT, when conditions are set to turn lighter. Follow live race updates via Twitter at @wmrt_liverace. To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Stage 6 Argo Group Gold Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour Quarter-Finals ResultsJohnie Berntsson (SWE) Stena Sailing Team bt Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 1-0Eric Monnin (SUI) Swiss Match Race Team bt Pierre-Antoine Morvan (FRA) Vannes Agglo Sailing Team 1-0Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One bt Staffan Linberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team 1-0Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar bt Marek Stanczyk (POL) Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing 1-0 Final Results of QualifyingGroup 1 1 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 8.5-02 Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 7-23 Johnie Berntsson (SWE) Stena Sailing Team 6-34 Pierre-Antoine Morvan (FRA) Vannes Agglo Sailing Team 5-45 Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa 4.5-46 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 4.5-47 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Match The World 2-78 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NED) Korpershoek Racing 2-79 Somers Kempe (BER) Raymarine/Ocean Electronics 2-710 David Storrs (USA) Pequot Racing Team 1.5-7 Group 2 1 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 8-12 Marek Stanczyk (POL) Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing 5-43 Eric Monnin (SUI) Swiss Match Race Team 5-44 Staffan Linberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team 5-45 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 4.5-46 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 4-57 Nathan Outteridge (SWE) Artemis Racing 4-58 Chris Poole (USA) Riptide Racing 4-59 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 3-610 Lance Fraser (BER) Digicel Bermuda 2-7

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (23rd Oct 2014): Conditions turned decidedly damp for the second day of racing at the Argo Group Gold Cup, stage six of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. A front slowly crossing Bermuda brought with it an overcast sky and rain squalls. Nonetheless, despite squelching their way ashore completely soaked, the Group 2 crews enjoyed the morning’s stronger breeze, the wind less shifty having veered into the southwest overnight, blowing down Hamilton Harbour rather than across it. At the close of play, with the competitors divided into two groups for Qualifying, 10 of the 12 flights have been completed in Group 2 and nine in Group 1. Qualifying will conclude tomorrow, but already the 2014 Alpari World Match Racing Tour championship leaders have secured their berths in the Quarter Final top eight with first placed Ian Williams’ GAC Pindar crew unbeaten in Group 1 and second placed Taylor Canfield’s US One team, holding just one loss in Group 2. Eric Monnin chases Canfield downwind © Charles Anderson / AGGC This morning saw the wind gusting into the high teens, which was enough to make the classic International One Design yachts a handful for the crews, who struggled to prevent ‘death rolls’ and Chinese gybes. Unfortunately during one match, Lukasz Kacprowski, crewman for yesterday’s overall leader Marek Stanczyk, sustained a cut to his head after he was struck by the boom. He was subsequently taken to hospital and received stitches. The most dramatic race of the morning was between Nathan Outteridge and Taylor Canfield. As the US Virgin Island skipper and defending Alpari World Match Racing Tour champion described it: “We were just behind coming on the first run and gybed on his breeze and probably the max puff of the day came in and we had a big windward heel, wipe-out situation as he started to luff us…” The result was the rigs of the IODs locking momentarily and a penalty for Canfield. Wet conditions for Artemis Racing © Charles Anderson / AGGC The two boats split at the leeward gate with Canfield taking the right and managing to plant a penalty on Outteridge for tacking too close, wiping his own penalty in the process. Outteridge made a last ditch attempt as the port tack boat to get in front coming into the top mark, but failed and was rewarded with a red flag penalty. Game over. “It was good, the tightest race we’ve had all week,” commented Outteridge. “I think when it gets shifty one boat gets ahead but in that one, no one was ever clear ahead the whole way around.” As to racing at both his first Tour event and first Argo Group Gold Cup, the 49er gold medallist from London 2012 added: “It’s been good apart from the weather, which was a bit average today. We are happy - we won a couple of starts today which was a good improvement. We are on the rise.” Sadly with a 4-5 scoreline, his team, representing Swedish America’s Cup challenger Artemis Racing, looks unlikely to make the Quarter Finals, strangely also true of the other America’s Cup team competing - Luna Rossa - defending champions here, which ended the day on a disappointing 2.5 points. Mathieu Richard mastering the brisk conditions © Charles Anderson / AGGC Among the success stories of the day was Mathieu Richard. “Coming from Brittany - we love the rain!” said the LunaJets skipper. “It is obviously better to sail in the sun - it is a bit different in the rain, because you can’t read the shifts on the water, but that is the same for everyone.” However the Frenchman’s mood was more due to winning all his three matches today: Yesterday he won just one. Group 1 took over from Group 2 at lunchtime, coinciding with the rain stopping, the heavens clearing marginally, but the wind dropping below 10 knots. GAC Pindar skipper Ian Williams won all his matches leaving him on 7.5 points with one race to sail tomorrow. “It was a little bit more straightforward today with the breeze in the west,” he said. “Not a great deal of excitement, but that’s how we like it!” Fellow Tour Card holder, Bjorn Hansen was also unbeaten and now holds second in Group 1 to Williams. Being among the second group to have gone out today, the Swedish skipper was pleased to have missed the rain, sailing in this afternoon’s slightly brighter and more benign conditions on Hamilton Harbour. “I am extremely happy about that. The first group coming in looked a little bit wet!” he said. In Bermuda Hansen is sailing with Danish match racer and stand-in tactician Rasmus Køstner, who is having to change gears, returning to the Tour from catamaran racing at the Extreme Sailing Series. “It feels good on board - everyone has found their roles and I think that we are sailing fast and we are making them right decisions,” said Hansen. But the main memory of the day will be the soggy conditions. “I was saturated head to toe!” commented Taylor Canfield after he’d dried off. “But it was great breeze and that was all you could ask for. Hopefully we’ll have more of that tomorrow.” Racing will start at 0900 (ADT) local time. Follow live race updates via Twitter at @wmrt_liverace. To stay connected, follow us on Facebook.com/worldmatchracingtour For more information on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, visit www.wmrt.com or contact \n This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Stage 6 Argo Group Gold Cup, Alpari World Match Racing Tour Group 1 Results After Flight 91 Ian Williams (GBR) GAC Pindar 7.5-02 Bjorn Hansen (SWE) Hansen Sailing Team 6-13 Pierre-Antoine Morvan (FRA) Vannes Agglo Sailing Team 5-24 Keith Swinton (AUS) Team Alpari FX 4-35 Johnie Berntsson (SWE) Stena Sailing Team 4-36 Francesco Bruni (ITA) Luna Rossa 3-47 Dirk-Jan Korpershoek (NED) Korpershoek Racing 2-58 David Storrs (USA) Pequot Racing Team 1.5-59 Arthur Herreman (FRA) Match The World 1-610 Somers Kempe (BER) Raymarine/Ocean Electronics 1-7 Group 2 Results After Flight 101 Taylor Canfield (ISV) US One 7-12 Staffan Linberg (FIN) Alandia Sailing Team 5-33 Marek Stanczyk (POL) Henri Lloyd Rainmaker Racing 4-34 Mathieu Richard (FRA) LunaJets 4-35 David Gilmour (AUS) Team Gilmour 4-46 Eric Monnin (SUI) Swiss Match Race Team 4-47 Nathan Outteridge (SWE) Artemis Racing 4-58 Chris Poole (USA) Riptide Racing 3-49 Phil Robertson (NZL) WAKA Racing 2-610 Lance Fraser (BER) Digicel Bermuda 2-6 FULL RESULTS HERE

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    Hamilton, Bermuda (24th Oct 2014): For the first time since 2003, Bermuda has been struck by hurricane strength winds not once but twice in the last fortnight. Yet remarkably over this period the mid-Atlantic British Overseas Territory has managed to lay on not just this week’s Argo Group Gold Cup, but last week hosted the world’s top golfers at the PGA Grand Slam. Being on the track of north Atlantic hurricanes means that the islanders have had to adapt over the years and for example a stringent set of building regulations help minimise the inevitable carnage when 100+ mph winds strike. Thanks to efforts of the National Hurricane Centre in the USA, hurricanes are not only tracked but great effort goes into projecting their track. After devastating several Caribbean islands, it was known several days in advance that Tropical Storm Fay and last Friday’s Hurricane Gonzalo were likely to strike Bermuda, so anticipating Gonzalo the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club delayed the start of the Argo Group Gold Cup by a day. Trees were uprooted by the effects of Hurricane Gonzalo Once Gonzalo passed they held a meeting to assess their situation. “If we had 95% of the island without electricity, then we’d have had a problem,” admits event Chairman Brian Billings. In the event only half the island lost power, one damaged International One Design was replaced and the devastation at the airport was such that it was operational again within 24 hours. “After numerous phone calls, we said ‘yes, we’re on’,” says Billings. Hurricane Gonzalo was vicious. Leaving the Caribbean it was rated as a Category 2 hurricane (83-95 knots) but hitting warm open water it built to a Cat 4 (113-136 knots) before downgrading marginally to a Cat 3 just before hitting Bermuda. Argo Group Gold Cup Event Chairman Brian Billings According to Billings, Gonzalo’s slow pace made it a ‘long storm’ with winds already up to storm force by 0700 local time on Friday and still honking by 1100 the next day. “In between my barograph took a very slow spin down and it went down to 27.5 [931mB] and then there was a little bit of a horizontal line and then she slowly came back up again…” This was in stark contrast to Hurricane Emily which came and went within just four hours. Strangest was the eye of the hurricane, continues Billings: “It was huge – it took an hour to pass. It was flat calm, very eerie and very misty – it was kind of weird. Then all of a sudden – womp – the eye wall hit and it came in with a vengeance, like someone threw a bucket of iced water at you unexpectedly.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo When Gonzalo struck Billings says the most wind he saw was 130mph while he was at home, however this was at sea level and it was stronger on higher ground. Despite this the devastation caused was surprisingly slight. This was partly thanks to Tropical Storm Fay having swept through a week earlier with winds of 110+mph. “When Fay hit we hadn’t had any major wind storm for quite a while, so the branches were heavy and we had a very wet August so there was a lot of foliage all over the place and the trees were all laden with flowers and buds, which added extra weight to them,” Billings continues. “So Fay took out of a lot of trees, and the clean up was longer than it was for Gonzalo - the roads were blocked for almost two days. Without that there could have been a lot more damage and the infrastructure could have suffered much more when Gonzalo hit.” Damages caused by Hurricane Gonzalo Through sheer luck, the timing of the two storms could not have been better. Fay hit leaving just enough time for the golf course at Port Royal to be cleaned up ready for the PGA Grand Slam, despite vast tree damage. “You wouldn’t have known it had happened - they got the course in great shape real fast,” says Billings. “Bermuda is very resilient and has a capability and the attitude to bounce back. People just jump in and help neighbours and we have our Bermuda regiment which helps.” During hurricanes, usually as devastating as the wind is the storm surge, the massive volume of water blown along ahead of the system. However this did not affect Bermuda. Billings explains: “They were forecasting 35-45ft seas outside of the reef line on the South Shore, but there is the reef that slows it down, so we don’t get a storm surge from there. If it goes from the north then it can come into the Great Sound, then it comes into the Harbour and has no place to go. That happened during Emily.” According to Billings hurricanes strike Bermuda once every 10 years. So having two in the space of a week means statistically they should be free of them for some years to come. Good news for the Argo Group Gold Cup in years to come hopefully.

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    London, UK (27th June 2014): There is the two boat format and its unique set of rules, but what also differentiates match racing from any other genre of sailing is that crews must be able to jump from one type of boat to another between events while remaining competitive in the process. On the Alpari World Match Racing Tour this year for example, the teams sailed Match Race Germany aboard Bavaria 40 Match Race edition cruising yachts, and will move to the DS37 purpose-built match racing yachts next week for Stena Match Cup Sweden. Bavaria 40s is used for the Match Race Germany © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT For Sopot they will compete in the Diamont 3000, a ‘conventional’ race yacht, typical of the 1990s, with in-line spreaders, running backstays and a conventional symmetric spinnaker. The next two events are in smaller, more modern, more nimble sportsboats, - the TOM 28, with symmetrical spinnaker, in Chicago and MaxFun25, with asymmetrical spinnaker at Dutch Match Cup. There is then a leap back in time, at the Argo Group Gold Cup in Bermuda, where a yacht designed in 1936 is used - the International One Design. The season concludes with the Foundation 36 racers used at the Monsoon Cup. Diamont 3000 is used for the Sopot Match Race © Photo by ShutterSail.com / AWMRT Just in this small group are boats with asymmetric and symmetric spinnakers (the latter using spinnaker poles, the former not), there are lightweight and heavyweight boats, boats with wheel steering and tiller steering, boats with running backstays and a fixed backstay and an age range from the contemporary back to an 80 year old classic. Obviously some teams prefer some types of boats over others, but success on the Tour requires crews to master them all, and to do so as quickly as possible, for teams there is two hours of official practice the day before racing begins though some teams try to fit in an extra day of training before that. International One Design is used for the Argo Group Gold Cup © Photo by OnEdition / AWMRT “One of the big challenges in the match racing circuit is getting used to the different types of boat that you sail around the world,” admits GAC Pindar skipper Ian Williams. He adds that some crews inevitably are more familiar with some of the boats than others, particularly if they are ‘local’ to them. “In the DS37s, we have maybe 15 weeks of experience now, but that is nothing like the experience of Bjorn [Hansen] or Johnnie [Berntsson], but it is an advantage over some of the newer guys, like David Gilmour.” Now one of the old hands on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Williams remembers that when he first started out he seemed to do better at new events sailed in boats unfamiliar to the old hands, simply because no one held a ‘time in the boat’ advantage. Tom 28 is used for the Chicago Match Cup © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT Aside from the different physical constraints, such as the type of helm and the spinnaker configuration, requiring the crew to adapt their roles on board, all of the boats also behave differently, particularly when it comes to acceleration and their turning ability – both vital features of match racing competition. Some lighter boats can be thrown around aggressively, whereas some other designs will simply come to a standstill if you treat them disrespectfully. Foundation 36 is used for the Monsoon Cup © Photo by Brian Carlin / AWMRT “There are a few moves, particularly in the low speed stuff, like in the dial-up that ends up specific to the boat, that you can manipulate,” continues Williams. “All boats accelerate slightly differently, so tacking styles are different between them. Some you have to press on with a firm trimmed genoa and some you have to ease the sails a bit more and come down a bit more to get it going. Learning about those idiosyncrasies across the difference conditions is important.” For the most part, skippers on the circuit like the challenge of sailing the different boats and that sailing them well is a vital skill for the successful match racer. As Bjorn Hansen observes: “You cannot win the World Championship by just being extremely good at sailing the DS37 or the IOD. You have to quickly adapt to new boats and sail all types of boats well. But that’s actually also a fun thing…” Mathieu Richard agrees that ‘adapting’ is the relevant word: “That’s one of the things I really like in match racing - having to adapt to all the different boats. I like the fact that we change boats and some teams feel better on the small boats and others feel better on big boats. My team, I think, we are quite good on every boat, which is one of our good points.” Keith Swinton also enjoys the variety. “It is one of the things that makes match racing fun, to sail different boats at different venues. It adds to the skill level of all the sailors. It keeps the playing field a bit more open as well. Some of the boats are better suited to the older guys and some of the younger guys might be better in the other boats, so it keeps a good balance.” Sailing the Alpari World Match Racing Tour in just one type of boat? That would make it just like any other circuit.http://design4u.kiev.ua/europosud.ua/

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    London, UK - 14 May 2012: Several rule changes have been confirmed for the 2012 Alpari World Match Racing Tour, coming into effect at the first event of the season, Match Race Germany in Langenargen on May 23 – 28. The Racing Rules have been amended in order to continue the positioning of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour (AWMRT) as the most compelling, competitive and pioneering action on the water. Craig Mitchell, Alpari World Match Racing Tour, Tour Director, expects the alterations to have a positive effect on the Tour, as well as match racing in general: “Match racing has evolved to the point where we currently have a great set of rules, producing some fantastic sporting action, as we saw quite clearly in the 2011 series. “Nothing major has changed in the past few years and we are enthusiastic in our responsibility to keep developing the rules to challenge our world class athletes and create the best possible spectacle we can.”

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    Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia – 27 November, 2011: Borrowing from the motor sports world, where the driver is in constant contact with his crew via radio comms, real-time coaching has made its debut today in the Quarter-Finals of the Monsoon Cup. Rule 41 of the Racing Rules of Sailing which normally prohibits ‘outside assistance’ has been amended here, so that coaches have been allowed to give advice and insight to their team via radio. Positioned on the third-floor balcony of the Ri-Yaz Heritage pavilion adjacent to the race course area, the coaches have an elevated view of the current and the wind, and can provide, when prompted, their insight on which side of the course to favour in each match.  Having been out on the water themselves and felt the pressure of having to read the course while under fire, the natural choices of coaches were from among skippers and crew who did not make the cut to the Quarter-Final round. When these choices were revealed on the evening prior to racing, it provided great entertainment, as erstwhile enemies now became allies in the fight that lie ahead: having just won his last deciding match by mere centimetres, Francesco Bruni naturally chose his hapless opponent, Torvar Mirsky, to be his coach, and Matthieu Richard was tapped by rival skipper Peter Gilmour YANMAR Racing to help lead him through his next round.  Kidding aside, this shows the depth of respect and trust the teams have in each other’s abilities, even as they have been battling each other throughout the season.  “The concept of prohibiting outside assistance goes back to racing on the Thames in the 19th century,” says Gilmour, who proposed to try this at the Monsoon Cup. “Back then when the tide changed, a boat could hand off their anchor line to someone ashore, who could then tow them up the course. So the principal of being self-reliant became rooted in the game, and not until recently has this changed.”  And the change has been considerable: few yachts venture anywhere now without a GPS, most offshore races now allow weather routing help through downloads of grib files, and the advent of sophisticated electronic tools and modern telecommunications has brought offshore sailors to all new levels of accuracy and access. Most aspects of our lives can now be influenced and enhanced by having access to information made readily available – look at the explosion in apps for iPhones, iPads, and the like.  So it’s not a long stretch to accept real-time coaching help to increase the performance level of the teams, and help allow the game evolve in some new and interesting ways, especially if adopted at other match racing events. Coach positioning, for example, can play a huge role, and not every venue will have the bird’s eye view afforded here in Kuala Terengganu. Will coaches then be allowed.  out on other areas of the course, on the water or even in the air? And what about at the lower levels of the game where teams are still learning: would it be right for the coach to tell them how to execute a difficult manoeuvre and provide detailed tactical advice, rather then just observations of the race course? If so, who will police this?  And once coaches are accepted onto the competitor’s boats, what’s to keep them off the umpire boats as well? Most umpires agree that the integrity of most calls are made based on good positioning, and even the best umpires can find themselves out of position when a good call is needed. Can a coach possibly help them as well? An electronic variant of this concept devised by Stan Honey and his team is already in play at the America’s Cup World Series, where umpire calls are made based on highly-accurate telemetry brought to match umpires pouring over their screens. Honey says the debriefs are no longer arguments about the facts of positioning – the telemetry settles this to within centimetres – but about the tactical options and rules that apply.  But here at the Monsoon Cup the input provided by coaches was more factual than directive: where the wind shift was seen to be, what side of the course seemed to have better current, etc., and not direct advice on what side of the start line or upwind leg to favour.  One team that enjoyed the most success from the coaching was newly-crowned World Champion Ian Williams Team GAC Pindar, who had already signed up 49er Olympic Silver Medallist Ian Barker to help them read the course area. And while not a match racer per se, Barker does, however, have tremendous coaching experience for Olympic aspirants, and was already on his way to coach at the ISAF Sailing World Championships the following week in Perth. With Barker’s help, Williams won the overall World Championship title in the Quarter Final, sailing a course area strewn with tricky current eddies and wind shifts.  Perhaps ironically, the teams with skippers as coaches did not fair so well: Mirsky’s Bruni went down 1-3 to Williams, and Richard’s Gilmour lost 1-3 to Johnnie Berntsson.  But not having a coach had its perils as well: both Will Tiller and Phil Robertson eschewed their option to take on a coach, and both lost to their rivals by close scores of 2-3.  How much will coaching be used in future Tour events? Probably more, as the Tour seeks to embrace new ways to enhance the excitement level even more, both on and off the water. - Article provided by Dobbs Davishttp://sites.google.com http://www.man-ms.com.ua www.europosud.uawww.mexes.com.ua/http://www.np.com.ua

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    Langenargen, Germany (9th June 2014): Downunder, where chief umpire Bill Edgerton comes from, there’s a children’s character called Blinky Bill, a laid-back cuddly cartoon Koala. But if the sailors on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour think they can pull the blinkers over their on-the-water officials, they’ve got another thing coming. Edgerton (known to some as Complicated Bill) and his colleagues are wise to their mischievous tricks. Most of the boats used on the Alpari World Match Race Tour are tiller-steered, but at Match Race Germany, the Bavaria 40 keelboat is equipped with a wheel. This offers the cheekier skippers a new opportunity to pull the wool over the eyes of the umpires. Just as professional footballers are prone to tripping over a blade of grass on the edge of the penalty box, sailors are not immune to similar forms of dyspraxia. Tight situations sometimes tempt sailors into the dark art of dissimulation. But Complicated Bill is on to them: “They're playing to the umpires! They're trying to gain an advantage, and it's a game between us and them. “They're always trying to show that they're doing what they need to stay out of trouble, and we're always looking to see that they're doing enough. So, they can exaggerate the drama of the situation and make it look as though it's more dramatic than it is in reality. But it's not as bad as a dive in football. “When you need to keep clear, you have to turn the boat, and if you're not close enough or not watching closely, they can slide their hands over the top of the wheel without actually turning it, saying, ‘Look, I'm going as hard as I can!’” Little beknown to the offending skipper, Edgerton is looking further down - below the waterline - for evidence of whether or not they’re really trying. “Actually if you're looking at the rudder you see there's no turning of the rudder whatsoever. It's up to us to try and satisfy ourselves if they are really doing everything they can, or if they're just playing a game.”news88.net http://www.europosud.ua http://motioncrisp.wordpress.comevakuator-servis.com/http://www.galid.com/

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    Langenargen, Germany (8th June 2014): Being a professional sailor isn’t just about being able to sail a boat fast, it’s about conducting yourself in a professional manner in every respect. It’s what you do off the water that counts too, such as negotiating with commercial partners who can help fund the costs of competing on a global circuit. French skipper Mathieu Richard has shown a useful knack of being able to sign a sponsor who can help his team perform on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. Last year, despite lacking a Tour Card, Richard succeeded in finding a sponsor in GEFCO who helped him compete on a number of events as a Wild Card holder. Victory at the Korea Match Cup and some other great performances were sufficient to get him back into this year’s circuit as one of the eight Tour Card holders. “It's a great feeling to be back as a Tour Card holder, because the last time was in 2011. We managed to get a new sponsorship with LunaJets, so they are following us for this season. I'm very excited and very glad to be on the Tour with my team, which is the same team pretty much as last year.” LunaJets, a private jet brokerage based in Geneva, already supported Richard on the RC44 circuit. “When I asked them if they wanted to go on the Alpari World Match Racing Tour, they immediately said yes, so they are very excited to be on the circuit with us. We hope we can repay their faith in us. They are very sensitive to the fact that it's a World Championship and we are a very high level team and we are fighting for the victory, for the title. They like this very much.” Richard has a very diverse background in racing, with world championship wins as a tactician in keelboats like the Mumm 30 and fast multihulls the ORMA 60 offshore trimarans. He has won the offshore challenge, the Tour de France a la Voile, four times, but in the past decade he has increasingly focused on match racing. Victory at the European Match Racing Championship in 2004 showed what he could do, and since then he has finished runner-up in the Tour in 2007. He has been a world force in match racing ever since. Richard attributes his success to having raced with a core of friends for a very long time. “I started match racing with Greg, my tactician, more than 15 years ago, so it's really been a while. Then Thierry and Olivier have been with me for eight or nine years. Francois Verdier, the bowman, started with me two years ago and Pascal Rambeau, the same.” While he’s competing in a combative part of the sport, Richard maintains a placid demeanour. “I am not sure I am very aggressive, definitely some are more so, like Bjorn Hansen; even the young guys, Robertson, Swinton, they like to be aggressive. It is not in my nature to be so aggressive. I try to stay smooth on the course to keep the boat fast and we also have good skills in terms of tactics on board with Greg as tactician. It's difficult to say just one good point about the team, we have a lot of skills and I think we are pretty strong in all parts of the game.” Aged 38, he is one of the older skippers on the Tour, but with many good years remaining, and with as much enthusiasm for the sport as ever, he says. “Obviously you haven't got the same spirit when you are 20 as when you are 38. When you are 20 you are starting out, and you are probably a bit fresher and looking at racing with, I wouldn't say more enthusiasm, but you discover everything for the first time. When you get a bit more experienced you know how it works, it's a bit different. You can bet on your experience to beat the others - and that's what we are trying to do.” But is there a danger of relying on experience too much, of not trying new ideas any more? “Not really, because sailing is a game in which you always try to improve every day. Even if I started match racing 15 years ago, I am always trying to improve and thinking about the moves, the start, the trimming etc. You are never satisfied with your level. It's about trying to improve all the time. Experience is a good asset, but you have to always be looking for new tricks.”http://online.casinocity.com evakuator-servis.com http://europosud.uawww.evakuator-servis.comhttp://goodportal.com.ua/

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    London, UK (9th Oct 2014): The German National Match Racing Championship kicks off today at the Constance Yacht Club, Langenargen Germany. Nine of Germany’s best match racing teams will go head to head in the hope of gaining an invite to next year’s Alpari World Match Racing Tour Championship event, Match Race Germany. The German National Match Race Championships will be sailed in Blu26 boats with a 4 person crew on picturesque Lake Constance in Germany. Felix Oehmes, who is one of the best ranked sailors in Germany, has his eyes on winning this year’s event. Oehmes of Hamburg Match Race Team who sailed alongside Carsten Kemmling at Match Race Germany this year, has gained much match racing experience against top sailors from the Alpari Tour and will have a few tricks up his sleeves in the competition. However, more experienced match racers Lars Hueckstedt of Heizkörper Sailing Team and Adrian Maier-Ring, helmsman for Innotio Match Race Team will be among the other contenders looking for the win this weekend. The winner of Qualifying will proceed straight to the Semi Finals. The next 6 teams will compete in Quarter Final knockouts before advancing to Semi Finals and Finals which are scheduled for Saturday 11 October. German National Match Race Championships Felix Oehme-NRV Match Race TeamLars Hueckstaedt-Heizkörper Sailing TeamAdrian Maier-Ring-Innotio Match Race Team IFlorian Haufe-Haufe Racing TeamJens Hartwig-Hartwig Match TeamChi Trung Huynh-ASV Matchrace Team Mathias Rebholz-Team Up!Felix Schrimper-Innotio Match Race Team II Tino Ellegast-Team Ellegast

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    London, UK (20th June 2014): The Batavia Sailing Center today selected the Batavia Regatta, which will run over 23 - 24 August 2014 at the Bataviahaven of Lelystad, Holland, as the official Qualifying event for the Dutch Match Cup 2014. The Batavia Sailing Center is the organiser of the Dutch Match Cup the recently announced Stage of the Alpari World Match Racing Tour. For teams wishing to race in the Dutch Match Cup two Qualification places are available. Both the winner and the runner up of the Batavia Regatta will receive an invite to the Dutch Match Cup which will be held between 24-28 September this year. The Dutch Match Cup and the Batavia Regatta will be sailed in MaxFun 25 boats with the race area directly in front of the port of Bataviahaven, very close to the shore, offering fantastic opportunities for spectators to enjoy the action. The organization of the Dutch Match Cup has two further Wild Card invites which will be decided upon later in the year. Batavia Regatta The Batavia Regatta will be an ISAF Grade 3 match racing event. Further information about invites to the Batavia Regatta and the NoRcan be found at www.dutchmatchcup.nl/qualifier/jobtalk.jp http://www.budmag.ua http://www.progressive.uawww.dxtranse.com.ua/europosud.ua/

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FEATURED SKIPPER

Skipper - United Kingdom

Williams’ story is a remarkable one and goes against the grain of his fellow Card Holders. While he started sailing at a young age, he actually pursued a career in Law first, qualifying as a solicitor in 2003. It wasn’t until he took a six-month sabbatical and won two Grade 1 events, which earned him a place amongst the top five in the World Rankings that he took up sailing full-time.

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STRONG TRADITIONS

Old traditions but humble minds

It has taken many years for competitive sailing to capture the public imagination and it has taken a return to basic principles to make it happen. Right at the beginning of yacht racing, in the 17th century, races took place between two boats going down the river to the sea and back, and crowds lined the sides of the river to watch it happening. It was easy to understand, because the first one home won, it was exciting and it was a marvellous spectacle.

Over the years, as is so often the way with sport, the experts refined the rules, introduced handicaps and developed a language that ensured that only a rarefied breed of sailor – usually a member of an exclusive club – would understand what was going on and very often even he would not. The wider audience didn’

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